Archive for the ‘Proofreading’ Category

Sometimes a word may not look quite right because there’s more than one accepted version…

…but be sure you know which style guide you, your company, or your client is using as even though there may be two “officially” accepted versions as noted in this article http://www.dailywritingtips.com/20-words-with-more-than-one-spelling/ it may not be right for your project.

For example, that article indicates that “acknowledgment” and “acknowledgement” are both acceptable but many people would think that the second one had an error. It’s worth double-checking as it may not be consistent with the style that has been used in the past and one of the golden rules of grammar and style is to be consistent–even if you’re consistently “wrong” based upon a specific style you’ve adopted.

We’ve heard it–but now here’s an infographic and data citing texting really can hurt grammar!

This piece offers greater substantiation for the often-heard claim that texting is having impact on grammar and style usage of those who text.

Here’s a deeper look at the effects and possible ramifications, including an infographic and data from PR Daily: http://www.prdaily.com/Main/Articles/14519.aspx#

Granted, it IS harder and more cumbersome to try to punctuate properly when texting even if using a fairly intuitive interface, such as talk to text, word completion, etc., for the actual words themselves–but per this article (and others) the legacy that has been created by all of this convenience and sometimes even laziness is a more accepting attitude about poorly constructed communications… It’s not always true that “they’ll know what I meant”!

A great article from PR Daily… tips for avoiding low-hanging jargon!

http://www.prdaily.com/Main/Articles/13932.aspx

Welcome to the 9th Annual National Punctuation Day!

Welcome to the 9th annual National Punctuation Day! According to organizers, the holiday “celebrates the lowly comma, correctly used quotes, and other proper uses of periods, semicolons, and the ever-mysterious ellipsis.”

There’s even a punctuation challenge. Click here for more info! http://www.nationalpunctuationday.com/

35 Fossil Words From Another Era!

Here’s an interesting posting on what linguists call “fossil words,” so named because they are artifacts from another era and survive only in isolated usage. You’ll also find the idiomatic phrases in which they appear–and here’s the link to the Daily Writing Tips post that featured these: http://www.dailywritingtips.com/35-fossil-words/

1. Ado: bother over unimportant details (“without further ado” or, more rarely, “much ado about nothing”)
2. Amok (or amuck): in an uncontrolled manner (“run amok”)
3. Bandy: hit, pass, or toss around, or discuss lightly or employ off-handedly (“bandy about”); bowed (“bandy-legged”)
4. Bated: restrained or deducted (“wait with bated breath”)
5. Batten: lumber for flooring or for sealing or strengthening a joint or a flexible object such as a sail (“board and batten”); to provide or fasten with battens, or to fasten (“batten down the hatches”)
6. Beck: summons (“at (one’s) beck and call”)
7. Bygones: what has passed or is in the past (“let bygones be bygones”)
8. Craw: stomach or crop (“sticks in (one’s) craw”)
9. Deserts: excellence or worth, or what is deserved or merited (“just deserts”)
10. Dint: force or power (“by (sheer) dint of”)
11. Dudgeon: indignation (“high dudgeon”)
12. Eke: accomplish or get with difficulty (“eke out”)
13. Fettle: state of health or fitness (“in fine fettle”)
14. Fro: away or back (“to and fro”)
15. Hale: sound or very healthy (“hale and hearty”)
16. Hither: near or adjacent, or to this place (“hither and yon”)
17. Immemorial: before memory or tradition (“time immemorial”)
18. Jetsam: what is cast overboard from a ship (“flotsam and jetsam”) — distinguished from flotsam, a word denoting what floats from the wreckage of a ship (that term is used elsewhere than in the phrase “flotsam and jetsam” and so is not listed separately here)
19. Ken: range of knowledge, perception, or understanding, or view or range of vision (“beyond (one’s) ken”)
20. Kith: friends, neighbors, or relatives (“kith and kin”)
21. Loggerhead: blockhead (“at loggerheads,” meaning blocked, or stalled, by stubbornness); also, a type of turtle
22. Mettle: quality, or vigor or strength of, temperament (“test (one’s) mettle”)
23. Neap: a weak tide (“neap tide”)
24. Offing: the near future (“in the offing”); also, the deep ocean as seen from the shore
25. Petard: a container of explosives for breaching or breaking a barrier (“hoist by (one’s) petard”)
26. Shebang: everything that is pertinent (“the whole shebang”)
27. Shrift: confession (“short shrift,” with the idea that a condemned person is given little time to confess sins)
28. Sleight: stratagem, dexterity (“sleight of hand”)
29. Thither: more remote, or to that place (“hither and thither”)
30. Turpitude: depravity (“moral turpitude”)
31. Ulterior: beyond what is openly expressed (“ulterior motive”); also, farther, or more distant, or what is on the farther side
32. Vim: robustness (“vim and vigor”)
33. Wreak: bring about or cause (“wreak havoc”)
34. Wrought: manufactured, ornamented, or shaped, or excited (“wrought iron”)
35. Yore: the far past (“days of yore”)

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