Welcome to 2018… home of the “youthquake”

Just a quick update to celebrate 2018 and share with you some words and terms that have become official, courtesy of Oxford Dictionaries. See more here: http://bit.ly/2CF4ZCw

With all of the stress and craziness and general buzz and busy most of us are contending with, using language correctly when we seek to connect with each other can be a real asset, so may the (word) Force be with you.

And, while you’re at it in our quest for ways to keep your language fresh and current, see more new additions from 2017 here: http://bit.ly/2Oxford

WDYT? (See the second link above for what that’s all about.)

Here’s a great piece on offering value in B2B sales from social-selling rock star @jill_rowley:

Want to know how the best salespeople do it? We asked a range of sales experts—including Salesforce’s network of talented guest authors, influencers, and our own sales employees — for their best sales tips. We then rounded up these genius tips in a new e-book, 100 Sales Tips for 2016. We asked sales experts for their #1 sales tip. Here’s what they said in this @Salesforce Blog post http://sforce.co/249OWBA

Just part of the piece is here… click through to read more. Jill Rowley’s commentary in the screen capture below (“It’s not just who you know, but what you know about who you know. Use social networks like LinkedIn and Twitter to learn about your buyers’ interests, skills, experience, common connections, shared groups, education, and circle of influence.” Jill Rowley, Social Selling Evangelist & Startup Advisor in case it’s a bit tough to see) is more important than ever if you’re genuinely going to provide value in a customized, consultative way to prospects and customers.

Jill Rowley and Salesforce Blog B2B Sales Tips

 

New Year’s Resolutions for Word Nerds (courtesy of @GrammarBook)

New Year’s Resolutions for Word Nerds

Below you’ll find GrammarBook.com’s New Year’s resolutions for self-appointed guardians of the English language. We language cops need our own code of ethics to protect us from ourselves and shield others from our self-righteousness.

The Stickler’s Ten Commandments for 2016

1) Thou shalt proofread. Proofreading your work is a dying art—but why is that? Do we really think that everything we write is effortlessly perfect on the first try?
2) No correcting someone’s informal correspondence. If you get an email that says, “We just want whats our’s,” stifle that impulse to respond with a dissertation on apostrophes. Maybe your correspondent is just kidding around—or didn’t proofread.
3) … And casual conversation gets a lot of leeway too. Language purists ought to ease off when people are just relaxing and making small talk. No one ever mistook a Super Bowl bash for a summit conference.
4) No using fancy words when simpler ones will do. A barrage of big words is impressive the way a mesomorph bench pressing six hundred pounds is impressive.
5) Always look it up. Twenty-first century technology makes it quick and painless to look up words like mesomorph. But for whatever reason, most people just won’t do it.
6) No correcting strangers. Grownups are so touchy nowadays.
7) Do correct your kids’ grammar. It’s not belittling if you do it right; they may even thank you someday. The English they hear all the time—from their peers, the media, even some teachers—sets a horrid example. Good English deserves equal time.
8) … But keep it private. Never give grammar lectures within earshot of innocent bystanders or service animals.
9) No excuses when you slip. We all make mistakes. If you’re nailed red-handed, don’t try to wiggle out of it.
10) Know what you’re talking about. Here is something your English teacher never told you: the rules change. So before you cry foul, how do you know you’re right? There are many myths about “proper” English floating around.
A century ago, contact as a verb was banned in polite society, and anyone who said, “I will contact you soon” was dismissed as a philistine. In the 1970s, hopefully was considered a ghastly vulgarity, and anyone who said, “Hopefully, the disco won’t be too crowded tonight” could be ostracized from the cool crowd. Today, no one has a problem with contact or
hopefully … but you may find yourself ostracized for saying “disco.”

Great “Word Crimes” song from Weird Al Yankovic—A parody of Robin Thicke’s “Blurred Lines”!

This parody is very clever and true! Weird Al Yankovic’s “Word Crimes” cited by Mashable as the perfect song for grammar snobs. http://on.mash.to/1r4E6JJ

This is kind of a fun one… “Where is the speaker from?”–Try the regional dialect quiz from PBS

Try the regional dialect quiz from PBS: http://www.pbs.org/speak/seatosea/americanvarieties/map/map.html

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